Eye Problems And Vision Anxiety Symptoms(Including Panic Attacks)

 

Eye problems and vision anxiety symptoms are something that can continuously affect your eyes, either on one eye, alternating between eyes or both eyes at the same time. These symptoms appear or are experienced indefinitely. Sometimes it goes away on their own, and sometimes it stays and happens often, but there’s not an exact frequency of how it is experienced.

 

It may precede other symptoms of anxiety, fear, panic attacks, and stress or be experienced on its own. These can be slight to intense, occurring in waves, and vary from time to time. It could also be intense in one minute, but then it’s only minor in the next.

 

Eye And Vision Anxiety Symptoms Descriptions

  • Abnormality in the vision like seeing stars, blurs, shadows, fogginess, and other similar things
  • Seeing objects not there but you can see them in the corner of your eye
  • Having tunnel-like vision
  • Losing some of the peripheral vision
  • Sight is often surreal and illusory
  • Seeing spots and blurriness along with flashing lights
  • An abnormally blurry vision for no reason when focusing on something
  • Needing new glasses prescription

 

 

What Causes The Eye Problems And Vision Anxiety Symptoms?

Anxiety can trigger the stress response of the body, which can then cause changes in the physiology, psychology, or emotions that will allow the person to deal with the stress or threat.

According to Patricia Hentz, EdD, CS, PMH, NP-BC, “One challenge in diagnosing the disorders is that most patients present with physical symptoms rather than psychological complaints.” She also explained that, “Anxiety disorders often coexist with medical conditions; in some patients, anxiety can aggravate and/or contribute to the medical condition, while for others, the medical condition is the underlying cause.”

One of the changes that would happen is the stress hormones stimulating the nervous system, which in turn will heighten the senses which include the sight.

 

If you don’t experience stress often, you can recover from these changes quickly. However, if you’re often stressed, your body might have difficulty in healing, putting your body in stress-response hyper stimulation wherein your body continually shows stress response.

 

These responses can also cause your sensory organs to have irregularities like in the vision. The symptoms mentioned above can be because of persistent stress. People who experience anxiety disorder can also experience these visual symptoms. While these symptoms can be due to stress, it’s not something to be concerned about all the time.

 

How To Eliminate Vision Anxiety Symptoms

If the vision symptoms are caused by stress, try to calm down so that the stress response and changes will subside. It is normal and can take up to 20 minutes to be patient.

According to Katharina Star, PhD, “Even when in full-blown panic mode, you may logically recognize that your fears are exceeding what is warranted by the situation.” She suggested to “[r]emain aware of how you’re feeling and remind yourself that it will not overtake you.”

If the symptoms are due to stress response hyper stimulation, it might take longer to recover from, and usually, it improves when the symptom is completely gone. When the body completely recovers, the vision symptoms will also fully recede so don’t be too concerned about it.

 

 

If you want to experience these symptoms less, it’s best that you lessen stress by doing breathing techniques to relax and also to rest instead of worrying too much about the symptoms. You can also go to an anxiety disorder therapist if you can’t help feeling worried about this to help manage your worry.

 

There are times when symptoms can include still persons for a long time even though the stress response has also subsided. Do your research and get help from anxiety disorder therapists to adequately address your anxiety and the symptoms as most of the time, treating the cause can be the best way to overcome the symptoms.

Mandy Rubin, LPC, wrote, “Once we build up a network of skills we know to be impactful, we can start to practice them in times of little or no stress. This creates a new pattern for reacting to stress.”